http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jellyfish_Lake
The golden jellyfish migration pattern is as follows:

  • Night - For about 14 hours a day the jellyfish make repeated vertical excursions between the surface and the chemocline in the western basin possibly to acquire nutrients from near the chemocline for their symbiotic algae.
  • From early morning to about 0930 - The jellyfish move from center of western basin to the eastern basin.
  • From early afternoon to about 1530 - The jellyfish move from eastern basin to near western end of lake.
  • As the sun sets - The jellyfish move briefly eastward from western end to western basin where they remain through the night.
The golden jellyfish rotate counterclockwise as they swim at the surface, presumably to provide even exposure to the sun for the symbiotic algae in their bodies.
Our freezer comes with a card that rates its electricity use, you know placing this model on a line that's the range for similar models. On one side the card is a U.S. ENERGYGUIDE, which says this is the most efficient freezer of them all. On the other side it's a Canadian ENERGUIDE, which says it's the least efficient. I guess Canada has higher standards.
Surely it's lucky. Two stalks are four-leafed and four-petaled. The stamens are nine and seven.

I'll collect seeds and try to see if they come true, if the squirrels don't molest them like the last trillium seedlings.

2011-04-30 four-leafed trillium
When we biked by the park, a bagpiper was practicing in the middle of the field, playing a deep second base. He was pretty good; even so the middle of a field is the polite place to practice, but he didn't need a bigger field. It makes me nostalgic for CMU. I like the sound of a bagpipe in the distance.

I may have spoken too soon about nothing else going wrong with the furnace.

cut for millipedes )

What is this flower? I like them. [Note: if you are skipping the lj-cut you do not wish to go to the previous photo from this one.]
Science News:
Bicycles, the team suggests, are more complicated than previously thought. While gyro and trail effects can contribute to stability, other factors such as the distribution of mass and the bike’s moment of inertia can play a role as well. Computer simulations that take all of these factors into account could lead to improved designs for folding bikes with small wheels or bikes that carry cargo, Ruina says.

To demonstrate the possibilities, the researchers sketched out several new exotic bicycle designs. One is predicted to remain stable even with a negative gyro that tries to turn a falling bicycle in the wrong direction. In another, the steer axis is reversed such that the handlebars are farther forward than the center of the front wheel.
Something didn't sit right with me about the marriage (in)equality thing I posted about. I thought it was "why am I giving this guy attention and respect for having been a moral turd", but it on turning it over that's not it.

I'm not giving him any credit for bonus moral virtue just for doing the right thing. I do give him credit for his side of the communication with the protesters and blogger who convinced him -- listening. He deserves that, and that doesn't take away at all from the credit due to the protesters and blogger for their side of it. They're the heroes of this story, if being a hero is combining rightness with action.

No, it's more about RJ's blog post, saying I detest promiscuity too, not all homosexuals are radical liberals[ETA <i>]. The smothering feeling that toning it down is what works, meeting them halfway is what works. What the ex-turd said about it brings it up:
At that point, between what I had witnessed on the marriage tour and RJ’s post about marriage equality, I really came to understand that gays and lesbians were just real people who wanted to live real lives and be treated equally as opposed to, for example, wanting to destroy American culture. No, they didn’t want to destroy American culture, they wanted to openly participate in it.
A real life is getting married; American culture is getting married.

But you know, I brought that one in with me. Marriage equality as a goal is marriage-normative. And then norming monogamy, long-lastingness, high degree of interdependence, all of those are fellow-travelers. Despite that I think marriage equality is a positive goal, but: all of those other family values and forms of respect that equality opponents fear that it's a gateway to? Yes, yes, yes, and yes.
(click through for the links)
http://www.metafilter.com/102347/I-now-support-full-marriage-equality
Louis Marinelli, activist for the National Organization for Marriage and founder of their 2010 "Summer of Marriage" bus tour, has announced today that he now supports full marriage equality. Gay rights blog Good As You has a detailed rundown of the story, including a spotlight on NOM's immediate efforts to discredit Marinelli's involvement in their organization.
Oxford origami engineers have published a paper giving a method of folding a paper bag down flat by "rigid origami" methods, i.e. bending it only at the creases. This invites the question of what's non-rigid about the usual method.

Playing with a paper bag, I'm not sure. It's certainly hard to fold it in a manner that is rigid, but I can't convince myself that it can't be done. The part that looks most suspicious to me is whether you have to twist the long vertical panels on the side, either that or bend the front and back. Can anyone see it? And describe it textually? :)

(Theorem 1 here says the state space of the rigidified traditional shopping bag is just the two isolated points "open" and "flat", but all the proofs are off in some full paper somewhere.)
The Galaxy Garden in Kona:



♥ "Bright emission nebula and star-forming regions are represented by hibiscus flowers." ♥
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/art98/janstar.html
The common starfish develops a so-called bipinnaria larva, with ciliated bands running about the periphery, a beautiful sight.

After several weeks the bipinnaria larva takes on a more elaborate form, with longer projecting arms and after some more weeks, a brachiolaria larva is formed. The larvae have their own gut, with inside cilia to inhale and transport food particles. They feed themselves with diatoms and other organisms in the plankton. The stomach is large and round and situated at the back side.

After this phase a large part of the larva degenerates and at the rear side a rudimentary formed juvenile starfish develops. The organs of the young starfish are formed anew.

One electrical box in the kitchen stopped working, both outlets of it. It definitely worked until the day or two before.

My little outlet tester says hot/ground reversed. I'm not 100% certain but I'm pretty sure I tested every three-prong outlet in the house (to find the ones that aren't actually grounded), and there was sure no hot/ground reversal. Which sounds like a weird condition to have, ever, plus extra-weird to spontaneously develop. I o_Oed and breakered that circuit off.

Now I ask Dear Doctor Internet (Electrical Dept.) and it sounds like that reading probably means "open neutral" and a load somewhere else on the circuit. The "backstabbed outlets" that the Doctor mentions seem to be described here.

I ♥ Doctor Internet (all her Departments), but I like a second opinion from Doctor Livejournal on electrical work. Also... if I find these are backstab, I'll probably change them all over to screwed, but I'm curious if there's also a way to debug which one went bad before opening them all -- it should be either the last *working* one in the circuit chain (if the fault's in the "outbound" neutral), or the first non-working one (if fault's in the "inbound" neutral), I believe?
http://antiquity.ac.uk/projgall/pettigrew326/
The age of Bradshaw rock art (also called gwion gwion) is uncertain but estimated by indirect methods at between 46 000 years ago, based on the time of extinction of depicted live megafauna (Roberts & Brook 2010), and 70 000 years ago, which is the age of the boab tree in Australia. In view of this antiquity, it is remarkable that Bradshaw paintings, often exposed to sun and rain, can be vivid and with high contrast, even though they have never been repainted. Conversely, other rock art in the same region, such as the Wandjina paintings, fades at a rate measured in hundreds of years and is often repainted. Here we report on cases where the original paint is no longer present in Bradshaw art, but has been replaced by a biofilm of living, pigmented micro-organisms whose natural replenishment may account for the longevity and vividness of these ancient paintings.


They find a fungus which they tentatively identify in the Chaetothyriales, and colonies they can't resolve to cells in the field but suspect to be cyanobacterial. (They report that they swabbed DNA, which they'll follow up with.)

An obvious question is why the biofilm continues to respect the original boundaries of the painting. The authors speculate "The etched cavities and pores providing microenvironments will exactly follow the shape of the painting if the original paint contained silica-dissolving microbes or acid capable of dissolving the cement between the silica grains." (They also suggest other reasons, but I didn't follow quite how they addressed the question.)
"Nothing is sin but what is thought of as sin."

(Belief of an "adept of the Free Spirit", as reported through Albertus Magnus in his writings against them.)

Cohn's book discusses a collection of millennarium movements c. 1100 - 1650 CE. I found particularly interesting those that he groups as the antinomians (I had to look that word up, Luther coined it to polemicize against them): the radical Beghards, the Brethren of the Free Spirit, the English Ranters. How closely these people would have agreed with one another's beliefs is not clear to me1, but Cohn puts this near the core: it's only sin if you think it is.

Very neat, isn't it? I don't see why it isn't more popular.

This is different than Christian Science, as I understand it -- this doctrine holds that Hell is real, sin is real, it's a real consequence of action of the mind. There are people (anyone remember who I'm thinking of?) who believe that a sudden thought come into the mind should be presumed to come of God. This is that, taken whole: the will of the enlightened soul is one with the will of God; God wills what I will. The Ranters are described (by opponents) as acting on caprice.

I find this a fascinating example in the spectrum of the varied relations of spirituality to self-trust and self-untrust. This is the furthest pole of self-trust I can imagine. And I find a kind of glee -- history, it's like the Internet, but it's bigger -- in realizing that any interior life you can imagine has likely been lived by someone in history.

Marguerite Porete:
"Why should such souls have qualms about taking what they need, when necessity demands it? That would be a lack of innocence and a hindrance to that peaces in which the soul rests from all things.... Such souls use all things that are made and created, and which nature requires, with such peace of mind as they use the earth they walk on."

Laurence Clarkson:
"Now observe at that time my judgment was this, that there was no man could be free'd from sin, til he had acted that so called sin, as no sin [...]"

1 I do suspect Cohen of being a lumper.
That's right, one solitary slow-cooked red kidney bean. The FDA says:
The onset time from consumption of raw or undercooked kidney beans to symptoms varies from between 1 to 3 hours. Onset is usually marked by extreme nausea, followed by vomiting, which may be very severe. Diarrhea develops somewhat later (from one to a few hours), and some persons report abdominal pain. Some persons have been hospitalized, but recovery is usually rapid (3 - 4 h after onset of symptoms) and spontaneous.
[...]
Phytohaemagglutinin, the presumed toxic agent, is found in many species of beans, but it is in highest concentration in red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris).
[...]
The syndrome is usually caused by the ingestion of raw, soaked kidney beans, either alone or in salads or casseroles. As few as four or five raw beans can trigger symptoms. Several outbreaks have been associated with "slow cookers" or crock pots, or in casseroles which had not reached a high enough internal temperature to destroy the glycoprotein lectin. It has been shown that heating to 80°C may potentiate the toxicity five-fold, so that these beans are more toxic than if eaten raw. In studies of casseroles cooked in slow cookers, internal temperatures often did not exceed 75°C.

They must be describing some worst cases of toxin level and sensitivity to it, I have to think? Or people would be vomiting left and right.
So apparently a Venn diagram is not what I always thought. What I always thought was a Venn diagram -- represent set relations as regions in the plane -- is an Euler diagram. A Venn diagram is specifically an Euler diagram that represents all of the combinations of set membership.

Crazy theorem: there exists a rotationally symmetric Venn diagram of order n if and only if n is prime. The "if" is a 2004 result; the "only if" is easier but not so easy.

Pretty pictures of Venn diagrams:
big colorful picture for n = 7 )
Why Evolution Is True offers a Brazilian leafhopper, as sculpted by kunstschmeid Alfred Keller:
click here if you like bugs made of crazy awesome )
1. incenter
2. centroid
3. circumcenter
4. orthocenter
my education in compass-and-straightedge construction ended here
5. nine-point center
A dude has a list of several thousand more, like they were integer sequences or something.

The coolest part is the theory of what a triangle center is.

Mathworld scatterplots them:


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